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Getting Down To It With France’s Strip Steve

Getting Down To It With France’s Strip Steve

Strip Steve would like to take you on a trip into the world of psychedelic-noir disco pop, and trust us, you want to go. The French artist just dropped his new full-length album Micro Mega and is accompanying the release with shows all across America in cities like LA, Chicago and NYC, bringing his unique electro beats to ears far and wide. Strip Steve took some time to chat with Melodysiac about his music, his name and his take on American electro.

Strip Steve would like to take you on a trip into the world of psychedelic-noir disco pop, and trust us, you want to go. The French artist just dropped his new full-length album Micro Mega and is accompanying the release with shows all across America in cities like LA, Chicago and NYC, bringing his unique electro beats to ears far and wide. Strip Steve took some time to chat with Melodysiac about his music, his name and his take on American electro.

Melodysiac: Tell me about the “Strip” in “Strip Steve.”
Strip Steve: (Laughs) Nothing to say really, it’s a stupid play on words with the name Steve, coming from a “Garbage Pail Kids” card a friend gave me one day. Don’t expect me to fulfill the stripping part in Strip Steve…
 
On your new album Micro Mega you seem to strive to showcase various forms of music including pop, funk and disco. Is it important for you to keep mixing it up?
Yes, absolutely. First, because if I didn’t, I’d be plainly bored doing music. I find there’s nothing less exciting than producers applying the same recipe to all of their tracks. Also it’s a natural choice coming from the fact that I’ve always listened to a lot of different types of music, and still do, so I guess it’s reflected in my music. Some people choose different AKAs for their different types of projects, I chose not to.
 
Is the album meant to be listened to in a linear fashion? Is there a story to tell?
Yes, it’s meant to be listened in a linear fashion, but obviously tracks having different moods, you’ll choose the one you feel the most at the time you’re listening to it. I’m aware the classic way of listening to a record (from beginning to the end, on a turntable) is now obsolete, so I wanted the album to work in both ways – either explored, or all at once. The story is mine, what I feel and want to communicate; it’s not a concept album.
 
You are set to play Electric Zoo this summer. Having toured extensively in Europe and played European festivals how do you find that they differ from American ones?
Well, I was a bit precautious when I knew I was going to tour the USA. The dance scene is not the same as in Europe, where a lot of “indie dance” can get pretty big. I had the feeling in America the focus was way more on big dance acts, that there was less balance. But after a couple of tours, I played without ever changing my motto, or my selection in my sets, I realized people in the US also caught up with the lesser-known stuff and knew a lot of what I was playing, even the most old school or underground. So yeah, I guess the line is getting blurry there, which is a great thing.
 
Some people think that being a DJ is easier or requires less skill than playing in a live band. Have you ever faced opposition as a result of this type of thinking?
No. I think people are not thinking in that fashion when they go to hear a DJ out at a concert. It’s true that it takes a lot more effort and courage to go live, rather than doing a DJ set, but to be honest, when you look at it closely, there’s also a lot of lives which are not really “live” or hard to do, and there’s a lot of DJs who make a point at providing something exceptional when playing records. I don’t think it’s that simple as to say live is hard, DJing is easy.
 
Electronic music is playing a major role in reviving concert ticket sales and attracting fans.
I think it’s in direct relation to the fact that music has gone less and less physical. Most of us basically spend their whole life in front of a computer screen, multitasking like a motherfucker, listening and throwing away music without really paying attention. So going out, seeing and hearing someone, being only focused on him or her for a certain period of time and sharing this with people is actually becoming more and special, and vital.

Why do you think now is such a big time for this type of music?
I think it’s a trend, and one that suits our time more than ever – before it was futuristic, now it’s the music of the present.
 
Dubstep: yay or nay?
I like a lot of English dubstep like Ramadanman, Blawan, Joe, James Blake, this type, but the typical American dubstep I’ve heard so far is not my thing, and they are very different.
 
You’ve lived in Bordeaux and Berlin. Where are you now? Where to next?
Still in Berlin, and here for a while, I think. But, I know I will move somewhere else one day. It’s important to me. Right now the only city in the world I could see myself live outside of Berlin is actually New York.

Hooray!
Yeah, that would be dope, but it’s so hard with this green card and all…

Images courtesy of Strip Steve

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victor

July 30th, 2012

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