Mood Music

Sound Tracking: Emancipator’s “Dusk To Dawn”

Sound Tracking: Emancipator’s “Dusk To Dawn”

Like a soothing stream flowing through the musical river of life, Emancipator’s craft has a special way of connecting with listeners in synch with mind, body and soul. His ability to evoke spirituality and provide pure audio therapy is a most unique offering in a deeply saturated industry. Doug Appling’s winding expedition of instrumental trinkets has always been a true treat from beginning to end, making him one of the top euphoric electro ensembles in today’s progressive music scene.

Like a soothing stream flowing through the musical river of life, Emancipator’s craft has a special way of connecting with listeners in synch with mind, body and soul. His ability to evoke spirituality and provide pure audio therapy is a most unique offering in a deeply saturated industry. Doug Appling’s winding expedition of instrumental trinkets has always been a true treat from beginning to end, making him one of the top euphoric electro ensembles in today’s progressive music scene.

This week marks the release of Dusk To Dawn, Emancipator’s third full-length album. A trip into even more mystical realms, Dusk To Dawn takes on new themes, evolving Emancipator’s artistry, in comparison to 2006’s trip-hop-heavy Soon It Will Be Cold Enough and 2010’s more mellow Safe In The Steep Cliffs. Dusk delves deeper into a multifaceted arena, building layers from worldly crevices and global nooks, utilizing more effects, techniques and instruments than ever before.

Already the signature on every new relaxation playlist of 2013, opening track “Minor Cause” pays homage to the melodic loveliness of Appling’s vision, inviting Ilya Goldberg to whine melancholy chords of violin and viola, while Madeline Hawthorne’s haunting vocal sample lures, casting a magical spell of grace and emotion. Emancipator’s mix of the track has its quintessential rise and fall, trailing off into darkness, and moments later, creeping its way back into the soul. The never-ending ballad is hearty with imagination, transporting listeners into a supernatural fairytale; one that only Appling is capable of curating.

The album’s title track integrates more than the expertly charming strings of another guest violinist, Thacher Schmid, it’s enhanced rhythmically by additions of both the guitar and mandolin by Derek Van Scoten, which give the track a most cultured vibe, marrying rootsy notes with jazzy undertones and bluesy licks, somehow still reminiscent of a woodland paradise. 

The standout favorite is “The Way,” the busiest track of the 10. The song is thick with substance, where Indian croons meet aboriginal didgeridoos in an inspiring mash of Cedar Miller’s percussion and woodwind accents. Halfway through, the familiar hum of seductive saxophone from Dominic Lalli (Big Gigantic) adds yet another tier to the fulfilling tribute.

For longtime Emancipator fans, it’s the faint return of Eve Grice’s syrupy echoes on the vibraphone-laced “Eve II,” and the intoxicating ivory chops on “Natural Cause” that remind us of the foundation we first fell in love with seven years ago. Only this time, Appling showcases a more mature, patient side of Emancipator, enhancing each and every second of studio time with his genius. Filled with instrumental twists and turns, Dusk To Dawn is the latest introspective journey into Emancipator’s deconstruction of music, and the rebuild of his most unadulterated, heartfelt gift.

Side note: Click here to stream and purchase Dusk To Dawn in its entirety. We recommend an organic, uninhabited setting to get lost in the sounds. Perhaps a remote cave? If a cave is not readily available, try a sauna, an eerie basement or another dimly-lit haven of relaxation or meditation.

Photos by Melodysiac © 2013; album image courtesy of Emancipator

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victor

January 30th, 2013

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