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The Indo(Chatter)Box

The Indo(Chatter)Box

Boston’s the Indobox is known in New England for curating a brand of distinctive psychedelic rock dance parties that keeps the scene on its feet year-round. After a trip to the annual Hempfest in Beantown where the quartet performed, Melodysiac sat down with guitarist/vocalist Mike Carter to smoke a cigarette and chat about gigs and recordings, genre evolution and the wonders of Pink Floyd.

Boston’s the Indobox is known in New England for curating a brand of distinctive psychedelic rock dance parties that keeps the scene on its feet year-round. After a trip to the annual Hempfest in Beantown where the quartet performed, Melodysiac sat down with guitarist/vocalist Mike Carter to smoke a cigarette and chat about gigs and recordings, genre evolution and the wonders of Pink Floyd.

Melodysiac: You guys just got done playing a lot of shows over the summer. If you had to pick, what was your favorite gig?
Carter: My favorite gig this summer was probably Catskill Chill. It was kind of your big end-of-the-summer festival. The location and staff were awesome. Everything about the place was very professional and put on right. The bands on the lineup were leaning more on the electronic side of the festival/jam band world, but there was definitely a mix of all other kinds of music from bluegrass to straight up funk.

We actually played our set right after this crazy storm, where there had even been rumors of a possible evacuation. Everyone stayed put and waited for the storm to pass. As soon as it did, we got up there and raged it. In my eyes, it was probably one of the best sets of music we’ve played since another show from the spring that I look at as one of our best shows, probably ever. We had a great reaction from everyone there. They were definitely into it.

Does the size of a show affect the way you play or how you feel performing?
Not necessarily the size in terms of how many people are in front of us, but something that more directly affects the feel of it. To me, it’s more in relation to how far away the people are from us. When you’re in a small, little club or bar playing to a packed room – yeah, maybe it’s a small amount of people – but those people are on top of you, and you feel all of their energy. At bigger shows/festivals, there’s usually more space between you and the audience. The stage itself is bigger, there’s usually a barricade several feet away from that stage and security people between the audience and you. A lot of times at those shows, it feels a bit more anonymous. In smaller, packed venues, you kind of see who everyone is.

That said, we have definitely had a lot of great shows on big stages in front of a lot of people. I’m not sure if those times we were just really ready, prepared, and so was the crowd, or if we just weren’t really thinking of the size of the place and how many people we were playing in front of.

I actually ended up at an impromptu show put on one night at your studio earlier this summer. It was completely packed and sweaty and awesome. People were inches from your face.
Right, that’s a perfect example of the situation I was talking about. We played this unannounced, private party, basically, and figured out we were doing it an hour before we played. So, not too many people knew about it, and the place was small, so we really couldn’t let that many people know. It felt so crazy to me playing that night. Everyone was raging right on top of us. It felt like the basement parties we used to play years ago when we first started. Like more, off-the-cuff or loose in general.

victor

October 9th, 2012

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