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Year In Review 2012: Melodysiac’s 10 Most Memorable Moments

Year In Review 2012: Melodysiac’s 10 Most Memorable Moments

As we prepare to bid 2012 adieu, Melodysiac celebrates the end of its first exciting year of content. And, in the past year, a team of four gifted writers took on a grassroots project, solely for the love of music. Together, we united to transfer our most noteworthy live music experiences from pit to page, in the forms of extensive reviews, in-person interviews and outstanding photo captures. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank our readers for all their support in following the site in its infancy. As we look back on this bombshell year for the progressive music movement, here are 10 of our collective top musical moments from 2012.

 

As we prepare to bid 2012 adieu, Melodysiac celebrates the end of its first exciting year of content. And, in the past year, a team of four gifted writers took on a grassroots project, solely for the love of music. Together, we united to transfer our most noteworthy live music experiences from pit to page, in the forms of extensive reviews, in-person interviews and outstanding photo captures. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank our readers for all their support in following the site in its infancy. As we look back on this bombshell year for the progressive music movement, here are 10 of our collective top musical moments from 2012.

1. A Bisco Superhero
One of the most memorable musical moments of 2012 happened for me at Camp Bisco XI in July. It’s no secret that I’m a Biscophile, and I hadn’t seen the Disco Biscuits perform in exactly one year, back at Camp Bisco X in 2011 in Mariaville, New York. Even though it’s always a treat and a privilege to have press pit access, standing in the thick of it for my favorite band’s fest set opener gave me an exceptionally huge adrenaline rush. Back at the campsite, a few minutes before showtime, we were discussing potential openers, and I suggested how bizarre it would be if they played “Save the Robots,” a typical set – and sometimes fest – closer. Sure enough, the first twisted chords of the epic escaped from Barber’s electric guitar and pierced me like static energy. Lights crashed overhead, thousands cheered and I couldn’t contain myself. The joy, euphoria and excitement climaxed all at once as Magner swirled tricked-out key combinations, Allen banged impossible beats and Brownie thudded deep bass, and I was a deranged pig in shit as the culmination and anticipation hit like a bulldozer. The lightning that flowed through me made me feel like I was a Bisco superhero for the entire 18-minute measure, and carried through the rest of the set. For the life of me, I can’t remember ever feeling that way at a show. It was the single best full-body high of my life. Save the music, no enhancers necessary. -Tracy Block

2. 2012: A SPAC Odyssey
Despite driving four hours to get to Saratoga Performing Arts Center in July, and my friend having to deal with the annoyance of being sold a fake ticket, as soon as CK5’s soul-penetrating illuminations began to shimmer, there was no doubt it was all worth it. After getting the night started with some spacey funk, Phish began to play the ever-popular “Tube.” As they segued from the first lyrical verse to the instrumental portion, a tingling energy became pungent within the crowd. Trey Anastasio’s guitar slowly whirled into the opening riffs of the beloved Talking Heads song, “Psycho Killer.” The opening verse flowed naturally as the audience bounced around in a nostalgic euphoria. The boys seemed to have been playing better than they had in their prime. When it came time for the chorus of the beloved cover, the crowd erupted. The lyrical segment ended as the band really let the funk bubble burst. This was the most energy I had ever felt, regardless of the setting. It was also one of the most powerful moments of my life. -Jonny Scoblionko

3. Icelandic Folk Takeover
Of Monsters and Men was by far and above one of my live music highlights of 2012. I had interviewed them a little over a year before when they were just a small band from Iceland, so I was glowing with pride when they sold out Hammerstein Ballroom in New York last month. Lead singers Nanna Bryndis Hilmarsdottir and Ragnar Porhallson were on the top of their game, performing wonderful harmonies and chatting with the audience. The band created beautiful, full music, hitting clear folk notes that made my heart skip a beat. Tears of happiness actually came to my eyes during “Little Talks.” On top of it all, the audience was absolutely wonderful, singing every word. -Gabrielle L. Sierra

4. Portugal. The Man: To Dap Or Not To Dap?
After a jaw-dropping, chill-inducing show in April by Portugal. The Man at House of Blues in Boston, I just couldn’t play it cool when passing them backstage with my friend who works at the venue. I didn’t want to stop and make them chat or anything, so I just stuck out my hand for “daps” and said, “Great show guys!” What I thought would be quick and painless turned into several long seconds of the band staring at my outstretched hand, a, “What? Oh…,” and a hesitant return dap. I left with my head down as my friend taunted me for my social awkwardness. Regardless, they are still one of my favorite bands and it’s still probably my favorite live show of 2012! -Sam Noderer

5. Catching The Deitch Sticks
Every girl has her preference of musician, and I’ve always had a thing for drummers. There’s just something mesmerizing about watching one human being multitask the kit, while producing a plethora of beats that don’t look like they should make more than a mess of noise. But, somehow, my favorite drummers always manage to impeccably deliver a symphony of multifaceted thumps that, together, create the foundation for any great jam. I’ve grown to especially admire the work of Royal Family drummer Adam Deitch over recent years. There’s something so badass about the way he carries himself behind the kit. He’s always so focused, but also completely present in the moment. And, each November at Bear Creek Music & Art Festival, I get to see Deitch go all-out as both a funk drummer for Lettuce, and as a breakbeat mechanical monster for Break Science. This year, after the killer Break Science late-night dance party, I caught one of Deitch’s drumsticks. I’m sure most people can’t quite comprehend the small sentiment, some have even said, “So what, it’s not like it was Neil Peart’s, or John Bonham’s stick.” But, there’s something about living in the now, as a progressive music fan, that made that moment truly special. A day later, I was gifted another stick from Deitch after Lettuce’s fest-closing set. I was lucky enough to have a Sharpie on me, so now I have a set of Adam Deitch’s used drumsticks (they are totally torn up) with his insignia. Soon enough, those sticks will be framed, and hanging in my living room, an eternal token of how music defines so much of my life. Oh, and there was also some signed boobage involved, but let’s not deviate from the true stars of the story – the sticks! -Tracy Block

6. Feisty Fiona
I had the privilege of seeing Fiona Apple in all her glory at the Wang Theatre in Boston last June. After opening up with an explosive “Fast as You Can,” she got on the mic and pointed out how much she hates when things go wrong with sound during live shows (something had just occurred that no one in the crowd had noticed). She then sauntered over to her piano and before sitting down, raised her shaking fists to the air and screamed at the top of her lungs, “GOD DAMMIT!!!!!!,” as she writhed in fury. A moment later, she casually sat down and began playing the passion-filled “On the Board.” What’s Fiona Apple without a feisty temper tantrum? So glad I got to see it live. -Sam Noderer

7. A Governors Ball For All
Governors Ball 2012 had the blessing of beautiful weather in June, which made everything just that much more pleasant. While Kid Cudi sucked big time, everyone else really came through to make it one heck of a show. Santigold fought through a sore throat to give a short, but high-energy performance and Modest Mouse captured the audience with their unique brand of indie rock. Fiona Apple owned Randalls Island with her set, singing a bunch of old favorites and hits off of her newer albums. All in all, it was a well-organized and well-run weekend, and a really awesome 2012 highlight. -Gabrielle L. Sierra

8. Chatty Rabby
After attending his afternoon drum clinic at AURA Music & Arts Festival in March, I had the opportunity to grab a drink and chat with prolific drum superstar, Johhny Rabb. I introduced myself and expressed how much I enjoyed his clinic, he pleasantly replied, “Yeah, I definitely remember you. That Goofy hat isn’t easily forgotten.” After a good laugh, we chatted for a bit about progressive music trends and styles, as well as up-and-coming performers. He was very down-to-earth and easily approachable. We had a blast during Brother’s Past and he told me a little bit about his music career and his current project, BioDiesel (featuring Clay Parnell of Brothers Past). He also let me know he intended to sit in with some artists that night, so it was great being in the front row when he cameod with Damn Right! later on. He is really an incredible musician and an awesome person! -Jonny Scoblionko

9. Beantown’s Royale Dance Party
Fatboy Slim graced the stage of Royale for the club’s own birthday party in May, and conducted what was easily Boston’s best dance party of the year. There were trapeze artists hovering overhead, and blow-up cakes, balloons, and confetti bopping around the crowd all night. I have amazing pictures of a girlfriend and I wearing birthday hats both on our heads and in a “Madonna-conical-bra pose.” We danced so hard to those old school hits and innovative remixes that I was sore for days. That man can throw it DOWN! -Sam Noderer

10. What A Peach!
Last summer, I had the opportunity to attend the first-ever Peach Festival in Scranton, Pennsylvania in August, and it was truly a unique experience. Taking place on Montage Mountain, an acclaimed winter ski resort, the landscape was absolutely beautiful. There were green, rolling mountains in the distance, as far as the eye could see, and the amphitheater stage was built perfectly into the mountain. Offering the unique experience of an onsite water park was hands-down one of the coolest things I have ever seen at a festival. I mean, there were even waterslides that started at the top of the would-be ski run, and ended right next to the Mushroom Stage – it was WILD! Unfortunately, I didn’t come prepared for a water park and I was only there for one day, so I wasn’t able to really experience the water park. The lineup was extremely eclectic and offered a wide variety of acts, including Railroad Earth, Tedeschi Trucks Band, the Allman Brothers Band, The Wailers and O.A.R. The festival was very well-organized, and aside from what seemed to be a relatively small amount of vendors, everything was great. I would definitely put my money on the Peach Fest becoming the Wanee of the North. -Jonny Scoblionko

Photos by Melodysiac © 2012

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victor

December 20th, 2012

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